All Of The Following Are Expressed In Biased Language Except ESL Pronunciation English Vowel Trivia

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ESL Pronunciation English Vowel Trivia

Most of these observations are necessary for completeness but do not affect understanding.

Roving Schwa

If the syllable is unstressed, it is usually safe to use schwa. Most words beginning with a- as a separate syllable, including the word “a” itself, use a schwa; and many suffixes regularly use schwa, for example: -a, -ain, -ance, -ant, -ence, -ent, -eon, -ful, -ic, -ion, -ive, -less, -ment , -ness, -ous, -ship (note that all of these are considered short (closed) syllables even if they end with a silent E). A short list of typical Swahili words capitalized with an unstressed vowel includes: abbOt, ballAd, bAnanA, biAs, biscUIt, burEAUcrat, circUIt, circUs, collegIAte, cOllide, colOny, cOnnect, famOUs, gUEme, famOUs, gUEme, Respect, lunch, sea , mountain, mullEin, head, ocean, doctor, porpOIse, trade, goal, rabbit, fast, Saturday, salAd, silent, tickEt, reliable, patio, etc.

The Many Faces of U

As already mentioned, the most common sounds for vowels are classical, short and long; and we learned about the silent E. We also need to remember some additional rules about U.

Silent U appears in most words with “gue” or “gui” and in words such as biscuit, lap, guarantee, guard, intriguing, varnish, languor, liquor, board, chaser, quay, and vanguard. The function of the silent U is to indicate that G has a hard “g” sound, not “dzh” (or C has a hard “k” sound, not “s”). The exception is “argue,” which is apparently pronounced (“argyoo”).

U makes the semivowel “w” sound in many words, most notably words containing “gua” and “qu,” as well as words like kitchen, suite, and tuille.

U also says its name (“yoo”) in a number of words, such as those beginning with u- as a single syllable, -ual, -ule, -uous (“yoo-uhss”), -ure or -ute as a root, and following words like: accuse, argue, botulism, bureau, fat, cube, cucumber (“kyoo-kuhmberr”), cuke, dome, formula, fuel, anger, hubris, hue, big, human , humility, humor, mural, muse, music, pubic, puke, pule, puny, pupa, simulate, spatula, virtue, etc.

European Vowels

More vowels than those listed here are included in the International Phonetic Alphabet. For OE and UE, two additional pronunciations are each common to French and German, and appear in loanwords brought into English from those languages ​​(they are also represented by the umlauts O and U). In general, these vowels can be ignored when learning English.

Syllable consonants

Consonants “l,” “m,” “n,” and “ng” may be preceded by a truncated schwa, giving them the syllabic quality of vowels. Usually schwa appears as some vowel. Most words ending in -AL are pronounced “uhl” with this short schwa. Most consonant words ending in -LE are also pronounced “uhl”; the most common environments are -ABLE and -IBLE (“uhbuhl”, “ihbuhl”). In these cases, the E is silent and the L takes on an unwritten cut schwa vowel. Some names and words like dirndl also contain the syllable L.

Final unstressed syllables ending in a vowel ending in “m” or “n” also have this schwa quality; Occurrence with “ng” is limited to very fast speech. Words ending in SM take a schwa and are pronounced “-zuhm”: abyss, prism, sarcasm, spasm, and all words ending in -ism. As a final trivia item, the three-syllable word carnage that changes the E to ING in the participle gains an extra syllable, but not an extra vowel, creating a unique syllable R: mass carnage is “maassuhkerrihng.”

Rare Words

Other less common vowel combinations usually seem unrelated; that is, they are compound words where two consecutive letters actually belong to separate word parts and must be worked separately and not mixed up. Also watch out for unrelated vowels between the more common pairs. Rare combinations that create different combinations when connected are:

AA is usually “ah” (not “aa”) as in aargh, baa, bazaar, laager, hi.

AO is usually “ah-oo”, as in cacao, ciao, miaow, prao, tao.

EH is usually “ey” like almeh, feh, heh, mikveh, tempeh.

UH is usually “yoo” as in buhl, buhr, fuhrer, muhly, uhlan.

UO is usually “ah” like buoy, fluor, languor, quattuordecillion, sonobuoy.

EAU is usually “oh” like beaux, bureau, chateaux, eau, tableau.

IEU is usually “yoo” like adieu, lieu, lieutenant, mieu, priedieu.

(IH, II, IU, IW, IY, and UW are usually unrelated.)

Single words add great power to a person’s vocabulary. The following words are rare exceptions to the usual sounds of letter combinations. They are good for looking at dictionaries and showing vocabulary and pronunciation skills:

AA as “hey”.

AE, like “ee” in aeon

AE as “eh” in aesthetic

AO as “ey” in gaol

AO as “oh” in pharaoh

Like “hey” in AU size

Like the “oh” in AU chauvinist

AY “aee” as aye, bayou, papaya, etc.

EA like “ey” in break, great, steak, etc.

EA really like “uh”.

EAU is like “yoo” in beauty

EE as “ey” in matinee

EI as “aee” in height, robbery

EO is as endangered as “eh”, the leopard

EO is like “oh” in yeoman’s language

AB as “yoo” in case

EW like a few “yoo”, hew, mew

EY as in “aee” geyser

IA as “aee” in diamond

In carriage, IA as “ih” in marriage

Like “ey” in IE underwear

Like “ih” in IE sieve

IH as “ee” in ihram, mihrab, shantih

II aalii, like “ee” in shiitake

Like “ee” in OE phoebe

OI as “ee” in decay

OI as “waee” in chorus

Like “wah” in OI patois

OO as “oh” in brooch

OO like “uh” in blood, flood

OU in stone, mould, spirit, &c. like “oh”.

OU bivouac, like “w” in ouabain

Like “ah-oo” in OUW vrouw

OY as “aee” in coyote

UH as in “uh”.

UI like “uh” in the gateway

Muumuu, UU like “oo” in a vacuum

UY “ee” like cliquy, guyot, plaguy

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